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Mission

When describing good, wealthy, peaceful life the English say that “life is a bed of roses”, while the Latvians allude to “living green”. But by “green” living we understand an orderly and clean living environment. We are surrounded by natural resources that we can use as fuel and in cogeneration, thus generating not only heat, but also electricity and fuel for vehicles – straw, sawdust, shrubs, poor quality grain. One just has to think a little about how to use what lies as waste beneath our feet or what the Latvian nature so generously brings up for us in its fields.




Data summarised by the Central Statistical Bureau show that in 2011 the amount of energy produced from renewable energy sources (RES) of the total consumption of energy resources in Latvia was 60 gigajoules (66 gigajoules in 2010).

 

According to Directive 2009/28/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council on the promotion of the use of energy from RES, Latvia must ensure that the proportion of energy generated from RES in the gross end consumption is 40% in 2020 (34.3% was reached in 2009, while in 2010 it was 32.6%).

 

The main RES types in Latvia are wood and hydro-resources, which provided for one third of the total energy resources consumption in 2011. Wind energy, biogas, biofuel and other biomass were used to a lesser extent. Solar energy is currently used in minor amounts in pilot projects.

 

The use of RES has several potential advantages, including the reduction of gas emissions, diversity of the available types of energy, reduction of dependence on imported energy resources (mainly natural gas and oil products). The increase of RES is also likely to facilitate employment in the country through opening new workplaces in the sector of “green” technologies.

 

In 2011, in the transition sector (amount of energy resources for the generation of electric power and heat for sale), renewable energy sources (wood, other biomass, biogas, biodiesel) accounted for 17.2% of the total consumed amount of fuel. When expressed in percentage, the volume of RES in cogeneration plants has dropped by 2.5% in comparison with 2010, which was due to warmer weather during the winter period.

 

Directive 2009/28/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council on the promotion of the use of energy from RES determines that by the year 2020 every Member State has to ensure that the proportion of energy generated from RES (biofuel, biogas, electric power generated from RES and consumed in transport) should be at least 10% of the final energy consumption for transport (in Latvia 1.2% was reached in 2009 and in 2010 – 3.3%)